Reference Detail

Ref Type Journal Article
PMID (26582061)
Authors Kastrinos F, Ojha RP, Leenen C, Alvero C, Mercado RC, Balmaña J, Valenzuela I, Balaguer F, Green R, Lindor NM, Thibodeau SN, Newcomb P, Win AK, Jenkins M, Buchanan DD, Bertario L, Sala P, Hampel H, Syngal S, Steyerberg EW, null null
Title Comparison of Prediction Models for Lynch Syndrome Among Individuals With Colorectal Cancer.
Journal Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Vol 108
Issue 2
Date 2016 Feb
URL
Abstract Text Recent guidelines recommend the Lynch Syndrome prediction models MMRPredict, MMRPro, and PREMM1,2,6 for the identification of MMR gene mutation carriers. We compared the predictive performance and clinical usefulness of these prediction models to identify mutation carriers.Pedigree data from CRC patients in 11 North American, European, and Australian cohorts (6 clinic- and 5 population-based sites) were used to calculate predicted probabilities of pathogenic MLH1, MSH2, or MSH6 gene mutations by each model and gene-specific predictions by MMRPro and PREMM1,2,6. We examined discrimination with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), calibration with observed to expected (O/E) ratio, and clinical usefulness using decision curve analysis to select patients for further evaluation. All statistical tests were two-sided.Mutations were detected in 539 of 2304 (23%) individuals from the clinic-based cohorts (237 MLH1, 251 MSH2, 51 MSH6) and 150 of 3451 (4.4%) individuals from the population-based cohorts (47 MLH1, 71 MSH2, 32 MSH6). Discrimination was similar for clinic- and population-based cohorts: AUCs of 0.76 vs 0.77 for MMRPredict, 0.82 vs 0.85 for MMRPro, and 0.85 vs 0.88 for PREMM1,2,6. For clinic- and population-based cohorts, O/E deviated from 1 for MMRPredict (0.38 and 0.31, respectively) and MMRPro (0.62 and 0.36) but were more satisfactory for PREMM1,2,6 (1.0 and 0.70). MMRPro or PREMM1,2,6 predictions were clinically useful at thresholds of 5% or greater and in particular at greater than 15%.MMRPro and PREMM1,2,6 can well be used to select CRC patients from genetics clinics or population-based settings for tumor and/or germline testing at a 5% or higher risk. If no MMR deficiency is detected and risk exceeds 15%, we suggest considering additional genetic etiologies for the cause of cancer in the family.

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Molecular Profile Treatment Approach
Gene Name Source Synonyms Protein Domains Gene Description Gene Role
Therapy Name Drugs Efficacy Evidence Clinical Trials
Drug Name Trade Name Synonyms Drug Classes Drug Description
Variant Impact Protein Effect Variant Description Associated with drug Resistance
Molecular Profile Indication/Tumor Type Response Type Therapy Name Approval Status Evidence Type Efficacy Evidence References
MSH6 mutant colorectal cancer not applicable N/A Clinical Study Diagnostic Germline mutations in MSH6 are associated with microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer (CRC), and are diagnostic for Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) in colorectal cancer patients (PMID: 26582061; PMID: 19125127). 26582061 19125127